2015 STEM Grants

MISF awarded STEM Grants totaling more than $113,000 to 22 MISF member schools for projects to be implemented during the 2015-16 school year. Following is a list of the Innovation, Starter, and Sustainability Grant awardees and their projects.

Innovation Grants

Academy of Holy Angels

Benilde-St. Margaret’s School

Bethany Academy

Concordia Academy

Highland Catholic School

Hill-Murray School

Mayer Lutheran High School

Minnehaha Academy

St. Charles Borromeo School

St. Croix Lutheran School

St. Jude of the Lake School

Sunny Hollow Montessori

Winona Area Catholic Schools

 

Starter Grants

Heritage Christian Academy

John Ireland School

Maternity of Mary-St. Andrew School

New Life Academy

St. John the Baptist Catholic School

 

Sustainability Grants

Cotter Schools

St. Anastasia School


INNOVATION GRANTS

Academy of Holy Angels

Richfield

Biotechnology and Bioengineering

The STEM Innovation grant will enable students to learn lab skills including fixing, staining, mounting, micropipetting, and plating. They will also engage with basic concepts behind bacterial transformation and gene cloning, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA fingerprinting, and gel electrophoresis. Students will also investigate the bioethical issues surrounding these technologies and the human/environmental implications. We will vertically align the biotechnology and bioengineering content in our biology curriculum between Pre-AP Biology and AP Biology.

Building our biotechnology curriculum will not only enable us to increase our students’ knowledge for future careers in the field, but it will also give students the tools to be informed citizens of a global community.  Knowing how current biotechnologies work and the possible implications of these new technologies will allow students to make informed decisions regarding healthcare, food, and many more aspects of their lives.

Back to top

 

Academy of Whole Learning

St. Louis Park 

The Growing Project   

Through The Growing Project, we will provide our learners with hands-on experiences that demonstrate the concepts of STEM through the use of a school greenhouse. We chose this project idea because it will provide our students with experiences they need in order to be successful in learning and in life. Academy of Whole Learning focuses on providing students with differentiated learning paths. Through this project we can meet the individual needs of each of our students.

Depending on student age and academic level, students will learn various skills and concepts related to life science and engineering. Students will observe life cycles of plants and test how outside factors, such as water and pollution, affect plant life. Students will also be able to simulate different habitats in order to understand how physical factors and climate relate to plant type and growth. As students gain more knowledge and understanding of plant growth, they will be able to learn how plants carry out photosynthesis as well as identify roles various plant parts play in growth, reproduction, and survival. Students will be able to work together to interpret data they have collected and come to conclusions based on their research and experiment results. Not only will this project teach students the important concepts of life science through STEM infused learning, it will allow students to apply important life skills, such as patience, observation, critical thinking skills, being able to follow directions and completing important tasks.

Back to top

 

Benilde-St. Margaret’s

St. Louis Park 

Water Quality in the Minnehaha Creek Watershed

One of the major units within the BSM Ecology & Environmental class includes an in-depth look at water quality in the community.  Students explore several aspects of the biological, chemical, and physical health of streams and lakes in the Minnehaha Creek watershed.  In the field, students will collect and identify macro invertebrates from Twin Lakes, Cedar Lake, and the Minnehaha Creek in order to analyze habitat health.  Students will also collect water samples to look for chemical imbalances in nitrates, phosphates, dissolved oxygen, acidity, and other markers of water health.  In the lab, students will design stream table scenarios to mimic healthy water flow and erosion patterns and then transfer that knowledge to an analysis of the Minnehaha Creek watershed.  Students will discuss the mechanisms of human impact on water quality and explore ways in which we positively and negatively affect water.  As a final service to the community, students will design and implement mitigation strategies for the health of the watershed.

This water quality project gives students an authentic experience that allows them to solve complex problems in a real context.  Students will design and implement experiments, mitigation techniques, and perform simulation modeling.  Each of these has the likely potential for “failure,” where students must assess their efforts and try again.  This project fosters the development of non-cognitive skills and attitudes such as persistence, metacognition, self-efficacy, and a growth mindset for learning.  All four areas of STEM are present in significant ways.  Students will be able to use the tools of real scientists both in the field and in the lab.

Back to top

 

Bethany Academy

Bloomington

9 Mile Creek Water Shed Salinity Monitoring 

When it snows, people and businesses, organizations and households often put down salt to try to melt the snow on roads, parking lots and sidewalks. Little thought is given to what happens to that salt after the snow melts and the salt is finally all washed away. Unfortunately most of that salt ends up in our lakes and waterways.  Is all that salt a problem?  If it is, how is it affecting the health of our biological community?  Is salt even necessary?  Are there alternatives?  This is the main focus of our project.

From older elementary and through upper school science classes, we will be examining the outcomes of putting salt on our parking lots here at school.  We will examine its affect on the soil immediately surrounding the parking lot.  We will also look at the salinity of the run-off from our parking lot, the salinity levels and other factors affecting the water quality in the retention pond recently built in front of our school to collect much of the run-off from our parking lot, and the salinity and water quality on our watershed tracing the water from our parking lot until it reaches the Minnesota River. We will be working with the 9 Mile Creek Watershed District to monitor our run-off and to test water along the path of the watershed.  They have also offered to connect us with Barr Engineering, who perform the water quality testing in this watershed, so that our students can see how they test the water and compare our results with their results.

Back to top

 

Concordia Academy

Roseville 

Water Quality Testing 

Concordia students will be conducting water quality testing for two marshes of the Harriet Alexander Nature Center in the city of Roseville, MN. They will write a research plan outlining the tests they plan to perform to accomplish the following:

  • Students will learn biological and chemical tests performed on water to indicate its quality and how the results of these tests are connected to the biological activity in the marsh water.
  • Students will learn the qualities of a healthy and unhealthy marsh ecosystem.
  • Students will explore natural and human induced situations that may lead to an unhealthy marsh ecosystem such as fertilizer run off, road salt run off, and impacts of a nearby leaf recycling center.
  • Students will also specifically be analyzing if the marsh located by a leaf recycling center has different measurements than the marsh at another location and determine if any differences are related to the presence of the leaf recycling center.
  • Students will summarize their finding in a report that describes the problem, hypothesis, materials, methods, results, analysis, conclusion, and future recommendations.

Back to top

 

 

Highland Catholic School

St. Paul

Seeds to Soup 

The “Seeds to Soup” Project will involve three major components:  STEM training for 17 teachers and paraprofessionals, increased student involvement in our school gardens, and a partnership between our senior parishioners with students in the garden and in a celebratory luncheon at harvest time. Teachers will prepare for this instruction by attending 30 hours of STEM curriculum development training provided by St. Catherine University. During the course, teachers will prepare lessons that support STEM leaning which will be implemented immediately.

Students will engage in hands-on work in our school garden beds, potato bins, butterfly garden and standing gardens. Lessons will incorporate STEM elements with ties to the Minnesota Framework and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Science Standards. Our new science curriculum was selected in 2014 for its strong STEM focus.

Back to top

 

Hill-Murray School

Maplewood

Computer Aided Drafting and Building a 3D Printer

Students will be building their own 3D printers and then learning to use Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) software to design parts to be printed.  In this course, students will be expected to employ a wide variety of STEM concepts to successfully solve real world problems they encounter.  In constructing their printer the students will be challenged to interpret technical drawings in order to properly construct pieces for their printer.  Then, once the printers are constructed, students will be working within the Arduino programming environment to fine-tune the settings of the printer.   In the second half of the course, students will be presented with real world problems they can solve with their printer.  For instance, students will be given a broken caster from a piece of luggage and asked to design and print a replacement.   One of the biggest goals of the course will be for students to recognize problems in their own lives and community and work to create and refine solutions.

In addition to this course, we are hoping to offer a course in which students learn to use a CNC router, a laser cutter, as well as a 3D printer.  In this project-based course, students will be given tasks that are drawn from real life and are relevant to the students.  These tasks will require a thoughtful approach to the design and fabrication of a solution to the problem.  The nature of each project will require a different approach and/or tool be employed, thus challenging the students to reshape their problem solving strategies.

Back to top

 

Mayer Lutheran High School

Mayer

No Child Left Inside®: Establishing an Outdoor Classroom Using Pollinator Habitat and Prairie Restoration

One of the greatest challenges facing current and future generations is to build a more sustainable, energy-efficient world. By teaching students through this project about the role of the environment as an important natural and national resource, we can prepare them to take on critical issues such as energy conservation, air pollution, climate change, and wildlife protection

Our school owns two land areas that could provide our students with fantastic out-of-doors educational activities if properly developed. Our efforts will be directed toward a 2.6 acre parcel of grass/alfalfa that is bounded by an existing constructed cattail wetland, a waterway and a state highway. The wetland and waterway areas will also be included in studies as they provide even more diversity of species. Our focus on pollinators in this project comes from our knowing that approximately one-third of all food consumed by humans is delivered by pollinators.  This would include fruits, vegetables, nuts, and coffee. Habitat necessary for rapidly declining populations of honey bees and monarch butterflies is also the very same diverse grassland and prairie flower habitat necessary for larger animal species. Pollinator habitat and prairie restoration projects such as this will not only benefit the birds and the bees but it will also provide educational opportunities for our students, students of other local schools, our school neighbors and community groups.

Back to top

 

Minnehaha Academy

Minneapolis   

Innovation Lab          

Minnehaha Academy’s Lower School will implement a STEM strand that involves all students from Pre-K through 5th grade. The project will involve designing, implementing and evaluating a STEM program that emphasizes four core strands: (1) Digital Citizenship, (2) Robots and Robotics, (3) Coding/Programming, and (4) STEM-based Problem Solving. This STEM Grant project will support the redesign of the current computer lab into a collaborative learning space, able to facilitate the types of imaginative learning experiences the Innovation Lab will provide. There will be desktop work stations, iPad workstations, collaborative seating, whole-group learning areas and flexible workspace.

Back to top

 

St. Charles Borromeo School

St. Anthony Village

LEGO Robots Fight Forces of Nature                         

Middle School students in grades six, seven, and eight, at St. Charles Borromeo School, will be building and programming robots using the LEGO Mindstorms EV3 kits. They will work in teams as they engage in creating their robots and will develop creative engineering skills in problem solving, logical thinking, programming technology, mathematics, and science.

The real-life problem that the project will be focused on is the destruction caused by forces of nature.  Students will research and learn about various types of forces of nature that are common in our community.  They  will also contact local professionals in the field to determine what our current plans are in terms of the disaster response process for our community.  Students will determine what we are doing to prepare for disasters, how will we respond to disasters, and how we will rebuild after a disaster.  Students will analyze the information and try to design and create an improved disaster management plan.  Students will then create a platform representing the community after a disaster, and use the engineering design process to design, build, and program LEGO robots to accomplish defined missions in community preparation, response, or rebuilding activities.

Back to top

 

St. Croix Lutheran School

West St. Paul   

Aquaponic Garden Project      

St. Croix Lutheran will build a new Aquaponic Garden for our school to provide our students with a dynamic learning environment. Students will learn valuable STEM lessons from participating in the design and on-going care of the garden.

  • Biology students will raise the initial seedlings and collect baseline data for the project. They will also help to determine the placement of the greenhouse.
  • Chemistry students will take initial and ongoing pH readings.
  • Applied Technology students will be involved in the construction of the outdoor lab.
  • There is also potential to provide learning opportunities beyond the STEM classes.
  • Our Future Business Leaders of America students will be able to plan marketing projects to sell the vegetables and flowers grown from the lab.
  • Our cafeterias would benefit from the fresh fish and produce raised on campus.

We believe this approach will increase student engagement as well as sharpen critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

Back to top 

 

St. Jude of the Lake School

Mahtomedi     

Monarch Butterfly Garden      

Through the development, study and maintenance of the monarch garden, St. Jude of the Lake students will have valuable hands-on experience as they develop their skills in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and math.  Some of the STEM related